Worship
 

   At our last Worship Committee meeting, questions about our communion practices here at Franklin were brought up. As in the past, some think we offer communion too much, some think we don’t offer it enough. It was a good discussion. While we may never get to “just right”, I would offer some thoughts.

Communion began on the annual celebration of Passover when Jesus told his disciples to remember his sacrifice as they ate the bread and drank the wine. Just as Israel celebrated the sacrifice of the Passover lamb when the angel of death passed over their homes, so believers in Jesus celebrate and remember his sacrifice of our sins when he died on the cross.
Holy Communion uses bread as a symbol of the body of Jesus and wine as a symbol of his blood. The act of taking communion does not save us, it is an act of worship and remembrance. Many churches and denominations have different views of communion, and hopefully these Bible verses about communion will help you decide for yourself how to best observe and remember Christ's sacrifice.
Acts 20:7    On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people and, because he intended to leave the next day, kept on talking until midnight.
   Isaiah 53:5    But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the   punishment that brought us peace was on him, and by his wounds we are healed.
John 6:35    Then Jesus declared, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.
Matthew 26:26-28    While they were eating, Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to his disciples, saying, “Take and eat; this is my body.” 27 Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, saying, “Drink from it, all of you. 28 This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.
Acts 2:42-46  42 They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. 43 Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. 44 All the believers were together and had everything in common. 45 They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. 46 Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts,
1 Corinthians 11: 23  For I received from the Lord what I also passed on to you: The Lord Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes. 27 So then, whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Everyone ought to examine themselves before they eat of the bread and drink from the cup. 29 For those who eat and drink without discerning the body of Christ eat and drink judgment on themselves.                                             
Communion is a holy act of worship. When I hear the words “the body of Christ broken for you” and “the blood of Christ shed for you”, part of me wants to cry thinking of what Jesus went through for me. Another part wants to smile with joy thinking of someone that loves me that much. We have communion next month. Think about what it means to you.
  
 
  God Bless,
James Bost